History@Portsmouth

University of Portsmouth's History Blog

Vinnie Jones and Paul Gasgoigne

‘Do it the safety way!’ 100 years of accident prevention.

In this blog Dr Mike Esbester, senior lecturer in history, discusses how he has been working with the British Safety Council in order to create an online archive of their material. Mike draws upon his research interests in his 3rd year Special Subject strand. Mike’s wide-ranging take on the history of accident prevention touches upon accidents at work, in the streets and at home, […]

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swanbird

Student Photography Competition – Winners Announced!

It gives us great pleasure to announce the winners of 2017’s student photography competition. We received over 40 entries and were blown away by the creativity and standard of these. There were so many which showed different and dynamic sides to Portsmouth and student life. We’d like to thank everyone who entered. The winners are […]

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Brad image

Exploring London low life: The forgotten East End.

As academics, we are often asked to conduct reviews, do consultancy work, or write blogs. In the following blog, written for the Adam Matthew digital archive platform, our Professor Brad Beaven discusses London’s ‘low life’ in the nineteenth century. The original blog can be accessed at http://www.amdigital.co.uk/m-editorial-blog/exploring-london-low-life/ When we think of the East End in […]

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Image taken from Miskito Hatchet in British Museum collection httpwww.britishmuseum.orgresearchcollection_onlinecollection_object_details.aspxobjectId=669732&partId=1.

The enemy of my enemy is my friend: An examination of the relationship between the Miskito and the British.

“Abigail based her study on engagement with, and critical examination of, a wide range of sources, from secondary ones to printed Calendars of government records and original Treasury Papers which revealed expenses for gifts to the Miskito to ensure a positive relationship. Extant artefact and pictorial evidence, though scant, was also employed. There was adept […]

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